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Video Podcast: Being the First Responder

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This week Michael talks about the necessity of medical training and emergency kits.

This is the first segment of this week’s Down Range Radio )

The full podcast (audio only) can be found here and second segment continues from timestamp 17m23s. 

REFERENCE LINKS:

The Michael Bane Blog

Michael Bane on Facebook

Homeland Security/STOP THE BLEED!

How to Stop the Bleed/American College of Surgeons

Medical Training:
http://darkangelmedical.com
http://lonestarmedics.com

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED
Greg Ellifritz/Active Response Training
Tactical First Aid and System Collapse Medicine
http://www.activeresponsetraining.net/upcoming-classes

Israeli Bandages

Choosing the Right Tourniquet
https://www.omnainc.com/blogs/news/how-to-choose-the-best-tourniquet
https://www.artofmanliness.com/2012/03/21/how-to-save-lives-like-an-army-medic-using-a-tourniquet-to-control-major-bleeding/

Adventure Medical Kits

Adventure Medical Kit TRAUMA PAK

Streamlight Head Lamps

Bravo Concealment Holsters

 

One Response to Video Podcast: Being the First Responder

  1. pigpen51

    March 7, 2018 at 6:45 pm

    Michael,
    I watched the video part of this, and had to leave a quick note, so I don’t forget. We all like to say, yeah, I know all that stuff, but then when you start to break it down, I found myself learning so many different things that I never had thought about. Like the headlamp. I have started to carry a better light, in my front pocket. It is a fairly big flashlight, but I can hide it ok, and I now would never be without it, I use it almost daily. But the headlight, I have several, and use them for hunting, and never thought about tossing one in each of my first aid kits. Duh, that is the perfect spot for one of them. I think we all have teeth marks on our flashlights. No more, with this simple idea that it took someone to point out to make me think of it.

    I knew about quik clot, but never really understood the utility of it, or of the way to use it, or the pressure bandage. So now, I am educated as to the right way to use them, and would feel comfortable doing so. I do plan on buying some, and then stopping at my local firehouse, and having them train me some, since they are always more than happy to help me out, whether it is showing me how to get an accurate BP reading or how to get my pulse. Not that they get bored, but this is a smaller city, and they are not on a run all the time.

    The last thing that your video taught me this week and I had to thank you for, is that I have not been as dedicated to carrying first aid supplies as I should be. I carry my firearm nearly 100% of the time, unless I am prohibited. And I drive daily, or I ride with someone daily. I am working to come up with a couple of different sizes of kits to keep in my vehicles, and to grab and take along when I leave the house, or leave the vehicles. If I go into a store, I want to have a small pouch with me, just in case, but I also want to have enough to be of use for at least myself, and one or two others.

    So I have to say, I think that it is just a matter of time before someone will write to you and say that you saved their life, or you saved their arm or the leg of their son or daughter. Because this information is that important, and that lacking in most of our training. I know basic first aid, but not this next little step up, and this is what I needed to make me that much safer, and to make me that much more useful in the event of a mass shooting, as well. So, thank you. From me, and from anyone who’s life you affect in a positive way.

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