Author Topic: Remington R1 hunter 10mm long slide  (Read 330 times)

robert69

  • Active Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 66
Re: Remington R1 hunter 10mm long slide
« Reply #10 on: May 17, 2018, 01:37:32 am »
Well, the gentleman/owner of Sprinco called me (great response time), asked for some measurements of the R1.  He said that he had the item in stock, and the best news is that with his part, I can use regular 5 inch springs.  With his part(s), I had him send along 2 different weight springs to try per his recommendation.  I really like dealing with small companies that know what to do.
With his part, there is a additional spring that is internal of the guide rod, which comes into play at the end of the slide stroke.  Therefore I can use 18 or 20 # springs for the initial start of the slide motion.
It sounds interesting, and I have to try the 18 or 20 to see which works best.
Sigh, that means I have to go shooting again, DARN.

The Down Range TV Forum

Re: Remington R1 hunter 10mm long slide
« Reply #10 on: May 17, 2018, 01:37:32 am »

jumbofrank

  • NRA Benefactor Member
  • Top Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6430
  • DRTV Ranger
Re: Remington R1 hunter 10mm long slide
« Reply #11 on: May 17, 2018, 11:32:05 am »
I would use the heaviest spring that works consistently. That and new Shok-Buffs will keep the slide from battering the frame as bad.
THE RIGHT TO BUY WEAPONS IS THE RIGHT TO BE FREE
A. E. van Vogt, The Weapon Shops of Isher.

robert69

  • Active Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 66
Re: Remington R1 hunter 10mm long slide
« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2018, 02:54:21 am »
Well, I got the parts this afternoon, and installed them. Very interesting design.  I can now use 5 inch coil springs, not the flat springs.  The front of the guide rod has an allen head screw that retains the front section of the two piece rod so you remove it, and so you can install it. You separate the front piece from the rod. Put the rod into the slide as usual, put the slide on the lower and install the slide lock lever.  Then install the front barrel bushing, as normal. Install the now 5 inch spring into the pistol. Install the extra supplied long spring cap in, and rotate the bushing to lock in the spring cap. Now, using the supplied allen wrench, install and screw it into the new spring guide rod just snug.  When I tried to rack the slide, NO Way! I thought I screwed up, so I called Sprinco for advice.
I guess I was stupid, but I did not realize that at the very end of the stroke, the very heavy spring inside the new rod had to be compressed slowly to the rear to compress enough for the slide lock to lock open the slide.  I mean that it required a lot more strength to get it there, but I did.  This springs purpose is  really slow the slide down at the end of the stroke. Also, I can use any 5 inch coil spring now. Springco recommended either a 18# or 20#, which ever one the will allow the slide to lock open at last round, and that the pistol functions correctly. 
By the way, I have seen a lot of machine work, and the workmanship on this is beautiful.
So after all this explanation, I will go shooting tomorrow to see how it works.

jumbofrank

  • NRA Benefactor Member
  • Top Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6430
  • DRTV Ranger
Re: Remington R1 hunter 10mm long slide
« Reply #13 on: May 19, 2018, 01:15:43 pm »
Sounds good, but the installation sounds harder than when I used a 2-piece guide rod. I would put the spring on the rear half of the guide rod. The spring had a front and rear end to it, and the rear end held tight to the guide rod. I put the barrel bushing, barrel, and spring with guide in, put the slide on the frame while still upside down, put the slide release in, put it on safe so the slide couldn't move, pushed the recoil plug in and rotated the barrel bushing, then installed the front half of the guide rod. It was just like assembling a standard 1911 except for screwing in the front half of the guide rod to finish. When the slide is upside down the barrel link doesn't move because there's no tension on it from the recoil spring, plus the barrel and slide stayed locked together every time. And with the thumb safety on you can push as hard as you want to on the plug, the slide isn't going to budge. It requires a lot less effort than trying to compress the spring with the slide back. Also, you can use your finger or any handy tool to push the recoil spring and plug in without that stupid guide rod limiting you in any way. I usually push it in farther than it needs to go with a screwdriver blade stuck in the hole.
THE RIGHT TO BUY WEAPONS IS THE RIGHT TO BE FREE
A. E. van Vogt, The Weapon Shops of Isher.