Author Topic: What is your procedure?  (Read 1998 times)

MikeBjerum

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What is your procedure?
« on: July 31, 2017, 01:29:46 pm »
From time to time I hear what others are saying at shoots.  Yesterday I picked up on comments about inspection.  One top shooter was advising someone using his guns and ammunition that it is important to inspect every round for proper primer depth and case condition as they load the firearm, and several others talked about the issues caused when they get someone else's brass after a stage and jamming their press.

These are not items I am concerned about, because I inspect and sort as I go.

The following are the basics of my reloading process - What are yours?

1.  Sitting in the recliner with pails - one of spent cases and hulls, and several for the different calibers and gauges and one for junk, I sort and give light inspection;
2.  Brass goes into the vibratory cleaner;
       2-a.  Hulls are wiped clean and inspected;
3.  Following cleaning ALL brass is inspected for cracks, excessive bulging, incomplete cleaning, and double check on caliber;
4.  Brass and hulls are counted and packaged for storage;

At the beginning of actual reloading session:
1.  Proper caliber set is installed and adjusted (if not already set up);
2.  Proper powder is verified or added;
3.  Powder drop(s) are checked for proper amount(s);
     3-a.  Proper shot drop is verified;
4.  Primer is checked to assure proper primers are in place;
5.  Bullets are selected and in place;
     5-a.  Proper wads are in place;
6.  First few rounds are measured and checked for all seating and crimping, and for all measurements.  I also test fire;
7.  At given points several rounds are measured and checked (I do at 100, when I am adding primers).  This check often includes a test fire.
8.  Final inspection of each cartridge or shell as it is packaged.

Because I use small catch containers, and I don't empty them until final inspection, I have what would be considered a "lot."  If I find a seating, crimping, bulging or other issue, I have only a small number to look into to catch all of the affected.

Some call me anal, and some do not.  Some think I waste a lot of time, and some do not.  However, I do not believe that my methods take any more time than any other person that looks for the quality and reliability that I do - I just do it all in one cycle rather than through the entire shooting process.

Because of my process, my reloads are as, or better, than factory in terms of reliability, and I have no issues while reloading or shooting.

Share your process.  Express your opinions.  Rip me apart.*  Let's discuss and learn!


* If you rip me apart, be sure and share your process so I can rip you back  ;)
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What is your procedure?
« on: July 31, 2017, 01:29:46 pm »

Rastus

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Re: What is your procedure?
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2017, 02:56:41 pm »
Sounds reasonable to me.  He who does not reload that has the stuff to do it but not the time.
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jaybet

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Re: What is your procedure?
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2017, 10:00:05 am »
Sounds good Mike. I only reload pistol ammo and I have a Lee Turret press, so it's 4 handle pulls per round. At that speed I can check my brass. Starting a new run I get set up and measure a few rounds. I only do 50-150 rounds in a setting, then leave it all there. When I go back, I weigh the first couple of rounds again.

Like you I have little or no trouble shooting. I once had a squib in 357 where I had skipped the powder charge in my very early days of reloading. The bullet was stuck between the chamber and barrel. I had to tap it back into the casing to free up the gun. After that I have never missed or doubled a charge.
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alfsauve

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Re: What is your procedure?
« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2017, 05:03:20 am »
For 9mm only,

Put only the sizer/decapper die in the LnL progressive.
Run 1,100 brass.   Other than the obvious, don't really "check" them at this point.
Then I put them, 50 at a time, in a chamber check block.  Weed out splits and bulged ones.
Put the rest of the dies in the press.
Load up the primer tubes (4 of them plus the feeder tube in the press)
Fill the powder hopper.  Run it 10 times, then measure/set the amount of powder throw.
Start loading away.  100 at a time, then stop, recheck powder, refill primers.

Will work for ammo
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Rastus

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Re: What is your procedure?
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2017, 07:54:39 am »
Since I don't reload, I am wondering how often you find your powder measurement "drifts" off setting.  I understand it will always be wise to verify the powder setting has not changed regardless of whether it ever has or not.  But, I am curious.
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alfsauve

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Re: What is your procedure?
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2017, 07:03:48 pm »
Since I don't reload, I am wondering how often you find your powder measurement "drifts" off setting.  I understand it will always be wise to verify the powder setting has not changed regardless of whether it ever has or not.  But, I am curious.

Temperature, humidity, vibration, weight of powder in column are all things that contribute to drift.
Will work for ammo
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MikeBjerum

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Re: What is your procedure?
« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2017, 11:13:17 pm »
Temperature, humidity, vibration, weight of powder in column are all things that contribute to drift.

I have my presses in the lower level (4' in the ground) of the house, and we run dehumidifier all the time, so the climate doesn't change much.  However, I do find that variations in powder levels in the drop and speed of cycle can make a big difference.  I have found that the best way to maintain consistency is to cycle the press slowly, and to keep the powder drop about 1/2 full (fill to 2/3 and don't go below 1/3).

One of the best moves I made to maintain consistent powder drops was stabilizing the bench.  My bench is a five foot Craftsman metal workbench with wood top.  I attached a 2x4 across the back, and I screwed it into every stud behind it.  I then stack all possible bullets along the back edge of the bench top.  There is no shake, shudder, or vibration with any of the presses.
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MikeBjerum

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Re: What is your procedure?
« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2017, 11:15:50 pm »
Alf,  Good point on the size check.  I have been doing so much cowboy loading that I forgot to mention that.  For the semi-autos I size check every cartridge as I inspect.
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guns4activits

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Re: What is your procedure?
« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2018, 07:43:36 am »
I gain so much more accuracy when reloading versus not. I found it is always good to go back to the basics and I'm constantly looking for ways to improve reloading. I included one of the resources I use to just fine tune my ammo.


https://www.pewpewtactical.com/ammo-reloading/

Rastus

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Re: What is your procedure?
« Reply #9 on: September 07, 2018, 06:09:15 pm »
That's not a bad website.

By the way, welcome to the forum.
Necessity is the plea for every infringement of human freedom.
It is the argument of tyrants; it is the creed of slaves.
-William Pitt, British Prime-Minister (1759-1806)
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