Author Topic: Remington Semi-Auto Hunting Rifle  (Read 1068 times)

Rastus

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Remington Semi-Auto Hunting Rifle
« on: July 16, 2017, 08:21:46 am »
It may be the death of me but I'm wanting to get my wife a semi-auto for hunting.  Maybe 243, better 25-06 or a 270 (who knows, maybe she'll want a 30-06).  I really want to get an old Remington 742 for nostalgia's sake...at least my perception is they may have been the best overall. 

The 742 was replaced by the 7400 which was replaced a decade ago by the 750.  Now these model numbers don't mean spit to me because I don't have knowledge of issues and remedies throughout the years with these things....they were never on my radar.  I know I do want to avoid something that had a propensity to fall apart after moderate use.

I don't have an issue with buying an old used gun that has maybe 20-150 rounds through if it was kept up with.  I don't want a beater that was kept behind the truck seat.  Nice wood matters more than a mechanical "hangnail" like some spring goes out after 5000 rounds so it needs to be special stainless steel, nickel coated thing-a-ma-bob to last the life of the gun.  All I'm saying is that minor glitches are not such a big deal...major design flaws are.  Over the next 20 years this thing may get 250 rounds through it so being "bulletproofed" for minor issues isn't mandatory.

I've not doubt someone here can educate me on the models and what works.  Gunbroker can do the rest!

Thanks,
Ken

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It is the argument of tyrants; it is the creed of slaves.
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Remington Semi-Auto Hunting Rifle
« on: July 16, 2017, 08:21:46 am »

billt

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Re: Remington Semi-Auto Hunting Rifle
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2017, 09:04:34 am »
No, No No! Don't Don't Don't! Back in 1985 I bought a brand new Remington 7400 in .30-06. And put a nice Leupold Vari-X III 3.5-10X 40 MM on it in Leupold mounts and rings. I cleaned and lubed it, took it out to the range with a couple of boxes of Winchester Super-X 180, grain Power Points to sight it in. Loading single rounds I got through about half a box and problems started. When I hit the bolt release the bolt wouldn't lock up.

This got worse until after about 20 rounds, it wouldn't lock up at all. I managed to get it sighted in, cased it up, and headed for home. When I got home I cleaned the chamber, (which wasn't that dirty), relubed it, and put it back in the safe. When I examined the fired brass, they all had what appeared to be a transfer mark of a galling from the chamber wall, on to the brass.

So my guess was the extractor was fighting trying to get the brass out of the gun, because of galling in the chamber. Most likely because the chamber was cut at the factory by a dull chamber reamer. I don't know if the extractor got bent or damaged as the problem worsened, because I lost interest in the gun after that. Not to mention I couldn't find a gunsmith who wanted to touch the thing. After I got a computer and got on the Internet a few years later, I started researching these guns, and soon found out they are extremely problem plagued in most every regard.

I almost bought the Browning BAR, and boy do I wish I had! They have very few issues compared to the 742 / 7400 Remington series of high power semi's. Yes, you'll pay more, but you won't be buying into what is almost a sure headache. You will find the few guys who have these guns that run well, are usually, "a box a year", deer hunters. Not guys who put high round counts through them.

One of these days when I get bored, I'm going to try to locate a good gunsmith, who can possibly get it up and running for me. But for now I've got so many semi auto rifles, AR's and M1-A's that run good, I just don't have the inclination to screw with the damn thing. Also, remember if your heart is set on buying one, most of them that are for sale are usually afflicted with some type of problem. So, "buyer beware" really applies to these things. If you really like the style of these rifles, (and they are a nice looking rifle), go with the 7600 Pump Action. From what I've read, they run much better, and you still have the same sleek lines. Without all of the operational issues, that follow these things around like a sailor on shore leave following a hot hooker.
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Rastus

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Re: Remington Semi-Auto Hunting Rifle
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2017, 09:15:42 am »
The BAR could be an option because it dresses up nice....the pump actions won't be because I know my wife won't want that.  A box a year is probably all this will ever do...and maybe less than that.  We have the AR's, FAL's, Rockrivers and such we use for training and fun (even an M2HB semi). 

This is the kind of info I'm looking for on the Remington's though.  I thought they had issues.  Did the 750's clean up the 742 and 7400's issues?     
Necessity is the plea for every infringement of human freedom.
It is the argument of tyrants; it is the creed of slaves.
-William Pitt, British Prime-Minister (1759-1806)
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alfack

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Re: Remington Semi-Auto Hunting Rifle
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2017, 09:23:04 am »
I own a 750, w/synthetic stock, in 30.06. No problems with it yet. Occasionally, you will get a magazine that is bad, but a very minor tweak with a pair of pliers and all is good.

billt

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Re: Remington Semi-Auto Hunting Rifle
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2017, 09:31:33 am »
From everything I have read on these rifles, it all comes down to if you're lucky enough to, "get a good one", so to speak. Some are, but most are not. I don't want to send the gun back to Remington, because I'll have to remove the scope and mounts. So if and when I get it looked at, I would hope I can find a good local gunsmith who would work on it without removing anything. What I may do is at least have the chamber checked with a good bore scope. These things are cheap enough now, so that most gunsmiths have them. At least then I'll know if I'm looking at a new barrel or not.
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les snyder

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Re: Remington Semi-Auto Hunting Rifle
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2017, 08:09:41 am »
first of all, I'm not a hunter...and I'm more function over beauty... but wouldn't an AR platform, available with excellent aftermarket triggers, stabilizing pistol grip, thin MLOK full float fore end... make a better choice... the Picatinny rail has to be a better optics mount than a set of rings screwed on with #8 cap screws... A1 stock is a little heavier but helps balance

available in multiple calibers ... 6.5s to WSM...

billt

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Re: Remington Semi-Auto Hunting Rifle
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2017, 08:36:27 am »
first of all, I'm not a hunter...and I'm more function over beauty... but wouldn't an AR platform, available with excellent aftermarket triggers, stabilizing pistol grip, thin MLOK full float fore end... make a better choice.

I never thought I would say this, because I'm more of a traditional "gun guy". But after buying and shooting my DPMS AP-4 .308 AR platform carbine, there is no way I would choose any of the conventional semi auto "hunting rifles" over it for field use.

The only exception might be the Browning BAR in .300 Win. Mag. But even that is doubtful because both NEMO Arms, and now POF make .300 Win. Mag. AR platform rifles. Albeit they're expensive, ($5,500.00 for the NEMO, and $3,500.00 for the POF). But they're like nothing else on the market. I'm not saying I wouldn't buy a all steel Browning Safari BAR, "just to have". But I can't see any reason for choosing it over the AR platform. My DPMS is accurate, eats anything and everything I feed it, and doesn't skip a beat. Not to mention how easy the AR platform is to break down, clean and lube after extensive shooting. It's a piece of cake compared to the Browning and others.
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tombogan03884

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Re: Remington Semi-Auto Hunting Rifle
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2017, 12:30:10 pm »
I would never choose a "civilian" gun over a military design.
Civilian guns are made to look pretty a lot and be shot rarely while for anything other than punching they bore they are expected to be sent to a shop for service and or repair.
Military models are designed to be used by unskilled operators,disassembled with out tools, repaired or modified by minimally trained operators , be shot 10,000+ rounds, and used in any weather and conditions.

billt

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Re: Remington Semi-Auto Hunting Rifle
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2017, 12:31:43 pm »
I would never choose a "civilian" gun over a military design.
Civilian guns are made to look pretty a lot and be shot rarely while for anything other than punching they bore they are expected to be sent to a shop for service and or repair.
Military models are designed to be used by unskilled operators,disassembled with out tools, repaired or modified by minimally trained operators , be shot 10,000+ rounds, and used in any weather and conditions.

Very true.
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alfack

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Re: Remington Semi-Auto Hunting Rifle
« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2017, 02:31:28 pm »
My dad had an old wood stocked 740 in 30.06. Zero issues with that one also. Nothing wrong with them.