Author Topic: .40 S&W Sizing  (Read 8913 times)

MikeBjerum

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.40 S&W Sizing
« on: January 25, 2015, 11:13:50 pm »
How many out there reload .40 S&W?

I am getting ready to start, because as I am sorting and cleaning brass I find that .40 S&W is by far my most shot round, except maybe the .22lr.

My question is if it is necessary to go through the step of a push through die for complete resizing, or if that is a fix for a limited issue?  I do have a single stage press, so I can do this with minimal expense and only time investment.

Experiences?
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.40 S&W Sizing
« on: January 25, 2015, 11:13:50 pm »

TAB

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Re: .40 S&W Sizing
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2015, 01:52:50 am »
If the brass came from a glock 100% unless it has a high $ barrel.  Otherwise no.  Most guys I know won't use glockerized brass.  Straight to the scrap yatd.
I always break all the clay pigeons,  some times its even with lead.

alfsauve

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Re: .40 S&W Sizing
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2015, 05:16:06 am »
For a couple of years I shot and reloaded .40SW and I used a chamber checker.  Resized a large batch of brass then ran them through the checker and threw out any that was enlarged.   I used an XD and never had a problem with my brass, but the checker was needed to check other people's brass.  Never used the push through die as I didn't find that many cases to warrant it.   I probably would have if I had kept on shooting 40.


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tombogan03884

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Re: .40 S&W Sizing
« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2015, 06:02:33 am »
If the brass came from a glock 100% unless it has a high $ barrel.  Otherwise no.  Most guys I know won't use glockerized brass.  Straight to the scrap yatd.

What is TAB referring to, and is it confined to only .40 cal or does it apply to all calibers ?

Alf, why toss the enlarged ones ? Why not just resize ?
 Was it rare enough to make resizing impractical ?

GASPASSERDELUXE

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Re: .40 S&W Sizing
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2015, 10:47:30 am »
I use a "Case Master JR" from Magma Enginering. I use it for 9, 40 and 45. It is an arbor press set up with feed tubes and a feed device. can do 30 rds in about a minute. The major item is cost. I have had it for 7-8 years and with the 3 dies it was about $500. More now. It takes care of the problem quite well. If the type of sizer you were thinking about was available then I would have bought it instead.

TAB

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Re: .40 S&W Sizing
« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2015, 01:51:42 pm »
What is TAB referring to, and is it confined to only .40 cal or does it apply to all calibers ?

Alf, why toss the enlarged ones ? Why not just resize ?
 Was it rare enough to make resizing impractical ?

Just the 40.  Using range brass, it is very common.
I always break all the clay pigeons,  some times its even with lead.

Solus

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Re: .40 S&W Sizing
« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2015, 03:57:40 pm »
Found a bit of explanation.  None of this is mine.
 
I've read that because the Glock was originally designed for 9mm it doesn't do as well with the 40 S&W in regards to safety. The following is taken from Wikipedia, though I've sen the same basic information elsewhere on the internet.

"The .40 S&W has been noted in a number of cartridge case failures, particularly in older Glock pistols due to the relatively large area of unsupported case head in those barrels, given its high working pressure. The feed ramp on the Glock .40 S&W pistols are larger than normal, which leaves the rear bottom of the case unsupported, and it is in this unsupported area that the cases fail. Most, but not all, of the failures have occurred with reloaded or remanufactured ammunition. Cartridges loaded at or above the SAAMI pressure, or slightly oversized cases which fire slightly out of battery are often considered to be the cause of these failures."
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TAB

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Re: .40 S&W Sizing
« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2015, 04:58:58 pm »
https://www.firearmsforum.com/Firearms/ImageAlbum/90/10025quote author=Solus link=topic=30112.msg300996#msg300996 date=1422309460]
Found a bit of explanation.  None of this is mine.
 
I've read that because the Glock was originally designed for 9mm it doesn't do as well with the 40 S&W in regards to safety. The following is taken from Wikipedia, though I've sen the same basic information elsewhere on the internet.

"The .40 S&W has been noted in a number of cartridge case failures, particularly in older Glock pistols due to the relatively large area of unsupported case head in those barrels, given its high working pressure. The feed ramp on the Glock .40 S&W pistols are larger than normal, which leaves the rear bottom of the case unsupported, and it is in this unsupported area that the cases fail. Most, but not all, of the failures have occurred with reloaded or remanufactured ammunition. Cartridges loaded at or above the SAAMI pressure, or slightly oversized cases which fire slightly out of battery are often considered to be the cause of these failures."

[/quote]


,look at this picture

I always break all the clay pigeons,  some times its even with lead.

ellis4538

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Re: .40 S&W Sizing
« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2015, 06:54:57 pm »
The push thru die for brass of unknown history is a must!  If you get a ptd make sure you use the lube they send along....makes things easier.  I cleaned all my brass before I realized I needed to ptd it.  After using the ptd I just put some of the brass on an old towel and rubbed most of the lube off.  Never have any problems with the lube contaminating the powder.  I bought a inexpensive Lee single station press to use the die in.  Also, get the attachment so that you can use a 2 liter pop bottle on top to catch the brass as it comes thru.  I cut a hole at the top (actually the bottom since it is installed upside down) of the bottle.  When it gets full unscrew it and the holder and empty it into a container.  I've been having trouble with 9mm also.  Will probably get an undersize die since they don't make a ptd for 9 mm.  FYI, I am using RCBS dies to reload.

Richard
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alfsauve

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Re: .40 S&W Sizing
« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2015, 07:39:09 pm »
Alf, why toss the enlarged ones ? Why not just resize ?
 Was it rare enough to make resizing impractical ?

I may be late in explaining this, but for those who want a short version.

The enlargement occurs in the web area, just above the groove.  This area doesn't fit in a normal sizing die, it's that twilight zone above the shell holder and just inside the base of the die.

Yes it occurs in 9mm, particularly when loaded to major power factor and shot in some guns.   The problem with 9mm is it is a tapered round so you can't have a "push through" die.   Most of my 9mm brass originally came from USPSA matches I sponsored, so a lot of it was affected.   I've weeded most of that out, but since I still take home range sweepings I keep testing the 9mm and still find a couple per thousand. 

For .40S&W, for me, it wasn't worth the die cost because I didn't find that many and by the time I was aware of the PTD I had decided to get out of .40 caliber anyway.
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